June 5, 2014 Hamilton RASC General Meeting Royal Canadian Legion Waterdown On – Mr. Haroon Oqab – Canadian Space Society – Guest Speaker

This Thursday we are in for a special treat!

Haroon B. Oqab serves as the Co-Chair of the Canadian Space Society Toronto Chapter. Haroon has earned advanced engineering degrees from The University of Western Ontario. Inspired by the Canadian contributions to human space exploration, the achievements of Project Apollo and the possibilities brought forth by the accomplishments of the interstellar Voyager spacecrafts, Haroon is interested in fully integrated spacecraft design with a particular focus on propulsion engineering, development of an interplanetary civilization, and advancement of technology for deep space exploration

Canadian Space Society

The Canadian Space Society Toronto Chapter (CSS-TO) is a non-profit organization made up of professionals and enthusiasts pursing the human exploration and development of the Solar System and beyond. The chapter’s goal is to increase public/community outreach with a focus on space activities and STEM, local leverage in space discussions, visibility of the CSS on a local scale, CSS-related events and unite all interested parties in an inclusive stimulating environment. Join us to find out what CSS-TO is up to and how you can get involved.  

Be sure to come out for our final meeting before the summer! ( and invite a friend!)

2014 Annual Banquet

Join us for a fine meal, good company, great speaker, and perhaps you’ll even win a prize!

The annual RASC Hamilton banquet will take place Saturday June 21st. The cost of the tickets will be $50 per person, which includes a free ballot for the door prizes. Cocktails (cash bar) and finger food at will be available from 6:45 and dinner will be served at 7:30

Our guest speaker will be Dave McCarter former President of the London Centre. Dave will be speaking on his extensive travels this winter in Australia. As many of you already know, whenever Dave speaks, the night will most assuredly be very entertaining.

The evening will finish off with our President Gary Colwell handing out the Star awards, for outstanding service to the club in the areas of outreach, board work and the outstanding new member award. All NOVA students will also receive their completion certificates at the banquet.

The banquet will be held at our usual Monthly Meeting location:
Royal Canadian Legion
79 Hamilton St. North
Waterdown, ON

Payment can be made at the general meeting a week Thursday (June 5) , or on-line using credit card (click on the link below). If paying on-line using our “PayPal” check-out, you will receive a receipt by email. Print this and bring it with you to the banquet.




Double Star with Weird and Wild Planet-forming Discs

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Astronomers have found wildly misaligned planet-forming gas discs around the two young stars in the binary system HK Tauri. These new observations provide the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result also helps to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits. Via: Double Star with Weird and Wild Planet-forming Discs

Mercury's bizzare magnetic field tells scientists how its interior is different from Earth's

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Mercury’s interior is different from the Earth’s interior in a way that explains Mercury’s bizarre magnetic field, planetary physicists report. Measurements from NASA’s Messenger spacecraft have revealed that Mercury’s magnetic field is approximately three times stronger at its northern hemisphere than its southern one. Via: Mercury’s bizzare magnetic field tells scientists how its interior is different from Earth’s

NASA-funded X-ray instrument settles interstellar debate

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New findings from a NASA-funded instrument have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Thanks to refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB. Via: NASA-funded X-ray instrument settles interstellar debate

Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the mass of galaxies

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Does the Milky Way look fat in this picture? Has Andromeda been taking skinny selfies? Using a new, more accurate method for measuring the mass of galaxies, and international group of researchers has shown that the Milky Way has half the Mass of the Andromeda Galaxy. Via: Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the mass of galaxies

Mysterious molecules in space: Silicon-capped hydrocarbons may be source of 'diffuse interstellar bands'

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New research has offered a tantalizing new possibility in the realm of interstellar molecules and diffuse interstellar bands: these mysterious molecules may be silicon-capped hydrocarbons like SiC3H, SiC4H and SiC5H. Via: Mysterious molecules in space: Silicon-capped hydrocarbons may be source of ‘diffuse interstellar bands’

The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?

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Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? A quantum experiment demonstrates a new kind of quantum paradox. The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll’s novel “Alice in Wonderland” is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel along a different path than one of their properties — their magnetic moment. This “Quantum Cheshire Cat” could be used to make high precision measurements less sensitive to external perturbations. Via: The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons … Continue reading

Printing the metals of the future

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3-D printers can create all kinds of things, from eyeglasses to implantable medical devices, straight from a computer model and without the need for molds. But for making spacecraft, engineers sometimes need custom parts that traditional manufacturing techniques and standard 3-D printers can’t create, because they need to have the properties of multiple metals. Now, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are implementing a printing process that transitions from one metal or alloy to another in a single object. Via: Printing the metals of the future